Fashion, Beauty and Style: Radoslaw Pujan’s Images

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by Radoslaw Pujan

by Radoslaw Pujan

It’s not easy to stand out in the genres of fashion, beauty and erotic photography, fields where the competition is tough and in which hundreds of artists thrive. Yet the Polish-born, Brussels-based photographer Radoslaw Pujan distinguishes himself in all of these highly competitive genres. Recently, his photography was awarded (by Playboy) the Fotoerotica contest. He was also  finalist in the prestigious Hasselblad Masters 2014.

photo by Radoslaw Pujan

photo by Radoslaw Pujan

Although reminiscent of the elegance and sensuality of Jeanloup Sieff, Pujan’s images are nonetheless very contemporary  in feel. His signature touch is a subtle theatricality and emotion, as apparent in the image above of the beautiful model, Iga Rakoczy. Many of his images, in fact, remind us of shoots from a drama that leaves the plot up to the viewer’s imagination.

photo by Radoslaw Pujan

photo by Radoslaw Pujan

Many of his sensual images play upon the notion of voyeurism, staging a play of glances between the watcher and the watched. But what is perhaps most impressive about Radoslaw Pujan’s photography is its versatility. His images cover the gama of life and human experience, from erotic, to fashion, to beauty, to historical, to nature scenes. The conventions of one genre spill over into another, enriching it.

photo by Radoslaw Pujan

photo by Radoslaw Pujan

Radoslaw Pujan’s erotic photos, for instance, are full of elegance, beauty and style, characteristic of fashion shoots. Analogously, his fashion images are very sensual and dramatic, as erotic photography tends to be. And his beauty shots find inspiration in nature photography. In Radoslaw Pujan’s artwork you will encounter a feast for the senses and a wealth of inspiration for the imagination.

image by Radoslaw Pujan

image by Radoslaw Pujan

Claudia Moscovici, postromanticism.com

http://www.amazon.com/Romanticism-Postromanticism-Claudia-Moscovici/dp/0739116754

Poetic and Spiritual: The Photography of Noell S. Oszvald

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by Noell S. Oszvald

by Noell S. Oszvald

Poetry, meditation and spirituality are often linked. Since the Romantic movement, poetry has been about using an economy of words–condensing meaning only to the essential–to express our profound feelings. Similarly to meditation, this process requires looking within.  The photography of the Hungarian artist Noell S. Oszvald is poetic and spiritual: a visual meditation through images rather than a verbal one through thoughts and words.

by Noell S. Oszvald

by Noell S. Oszvald

It seems to be inspired by the the Buddhist practice of focused thought to achieve peace of mind and the cultivation of wisdom. There’s also a certain animism in it, as the human figure–usually a willowy and beautiful young woman with long dark hair–appears in total harmony with her environment. She often mirrors the positions of the objects or beings around her.

by Noell S. Oszvald

by Noell S. Oszvald

Like in poetry, form itself takes on the utmost importance. In one image we see the young woman from behind assuming exactly the same position as the cat sitting next to her. In another photo, she bends like the tree close to her, in an environment as minimalist and stark as the setting of Samuel Beckett’s plays. In fact, the human being mimics so well her surroundings that she, too, appears to be a prop in the theater of life.

by Noell S. Oszvald

by Noell S. Oszvald

Beckett once said, “All I know is what the words know, and dead things, and that makes a handsome little sum, with a beginning and a middle and an end, as in the well-built phrase and the long sonata of the dead.”

by Noell S. Oszvald

by Noell S. Oszvald

Existential in mood without being somber, Noell S. Oszvald’s photographs do not offer, however, a long sonata of the dead. They stage the perfect setting for a meditation about life, simplicity of forms, oneness between body and mind, and a sense of harmony with our surroundings that doesn’t place human beings on top, but rather as one with nature.

Claudia Moscovici, postromanticism.com

http://www.amazon.com/Romanticism-Postromanticism-Claudia-Moscovici/dp/0739116754

 

Commemorating childhood: The figurative art of Mark Lovett

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by Mark Lovett

by Mark Lovett

I find it rather extraordinary that we commemorate through art important historical events, war heroes, authors and political leaders, yet we rarely commemorate in art what is most important to most of us: our family lives and our children. During the 19th and 20th centuries, depicting children in art was usually relegated to female painters (most notably, Mary Cassatt and Berthe Morisot) or depicted with unsettling undertones of sexuality, as is the case in Balthus’s controversial paintings.

The figurative painter Mark Lovett commemorates through his beautiful paintings and photographs what matters most to so many of us: our children. Mark Lovett depicts children,  particularly girls, during the years (between 3 and 12) when they are old enough to appreciate family activities yet young enough to still enjoy the company of their parents. The subject of family and children is inherently personal, so I will mention one personal note, which is part of the reason why I’m so touched by Mark Lovett’s art. I remember with great fondness the many activities my husband and I did with our children, Alex and Sophie, when they were younger: apple orchards, zoo trips, museums, Renaissance fairs, art camps, cub scouts, hiking and vacations in so many beautiful places around the world. The kids, and their joie de vivre, added enormous pleasure and sense of meaning to our lives.

by Mark Lovett

by Mark Lovett

Because this part of childhood and family life lasts roughly ten years, it’s easy to have the false impression that it will never go away. Yet like everything beautiful in life, it’s ephemeral  and it passes. As the children grow up,  you can relive your their early years and the joy they brought to your family in your memory, in your heart and, if you’re fortunate, in great artwork like the one created by Mark Lovett.

by Mark Lovett

by Mark Lovett

Mark is a graduate of the University of Maryland, where he studied figurative and portrait painting at Nelson Shanks’ Studio Incamminati in Pennsylvania and of The Art League School in Alexandria, VA. As  you can probably tell by looking at  his realist paintings, Mark finds inspiration in the old masters. He is particularly influenced by the works of Bouguereau, Sargent, Renoir and Monet. He employs many of their techniques, particularly in depicting his subjects in a realistic fashion. Yet ultimately, like all great painters, he has his own unique style.

by Mark Lovett

by Mark Lovett

Mark’s works depict children in an unsentimental fashion that nonetheless evokes the best experiences many of us have of our family lives. His backgrounds tend to use bold strokes, while his figures themselves–the children–are very finely painted, with a delicate touch that captures their individual features and expressions.

As you can see on his website,http://www.marklovettstudio.com/,Mark has won numerous awards including: 2006 Portrait Society of America Children’s Portrait Competition;  MD Annual Art Show and 2005 Rockville Art League Art Show Winner. His works have been featured in numerous magazines, including Washington Spaces Magazine 2007 and 2006; Who’s Who of Strathmore Worldwide 2007-2008; Preview Magazine Art Expo, NY 2007; Strathmore Applause Magazine cover 2006; Art Business News Magazine 2006 and 2005.  You can view his works primarily in his own studio, MarkLovettStudio, as well as in several galleries in the U.S. and Europe, including the prestigious gallery Galerie Pierre in France (http://about.me/GaleriePierre). Thanks to Mark Lovett’s talent and works, we can commemorate our children’s most fun and memorable years through art, as well as in our lives and fondest memories.

Claudia Moscovici, postromanticism.com

http://www.amazon.com/Romanticism-Postromanticism-Claudia-Moscovici/dp/0739116754

The Photography of Bill Gekas and its Alice in Wonderland Imagination

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Bill Gekas

Bill Gekas

A self-taught artist of Greek origin born and raised in Melbourne Australia, photographer Bill Gekas is well-known around the world for his distinctive, Alice in Wonderland style that has won him numerous prestigious awards. In 2012, he received  Gold in the International Loupe Awards  and Silver in Le Prix de la Photographie in Paris.

Bill Gekas

Bill Gekas

His images usually feature a young girl of an unearthly cuteness in settings that sometimes take us back to different periods of art history and at other times carry us even further away, in fantastic and idiosyncratic realms of the imagination. This is why I drew the comparison between Bill Gekas’ images and Lewis Carroll’s popular tale.

Bill Gekas and the Alice in Wonderland imagination

Bill Gekas and the Alice in Wonderland imagination

Although “Alice in Wonderland” was published in 1865, it remains to this day one of the most beloved stories for both children and adults. The story has everything to please kids—colorful characters, an exciting, fancy-filled plot, plus lessons in life if you’re looking for them—and enough mental paradoxes, puzzles and symbolism to engage even the most brainy adults. Since Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) was a mathematician who incorporated elements of his field into the narrative, some have even identified non-Euclidean geometry in the Cheshire cat’s disappearing body and residual grin.

Bill Gekas

Bill Gekas

Bill Gekas experiments through photography with finding complexity in a seemingly simple motif: the portrait of a young girl. Through countless variations on this theme, Gekas offers viewers fascinating slices of the history of art, including allusions to the paintings of Vermeer and Rembrandt, to literary works, such as Alice in Wonderland. 

Bill Gekas

Bill Gekas

He pays enormous attention not only to conveying the rich and ever-changing expressions of the little girl, but also to capturing the texture, color and feel of the various settings. The vivid tableaux he creates featuring the same model are, arguably, far more diverse than if you considered the works of different artists working in the same genre. Achieving this variety while working with the same subject takes enormous skill at the craft of photography and a very rich and ingenious imagination. Bill Gekas welcomes you to his fantastic photographic world on the website http://www.billgekas.com/.

Claudia Moscovici, postromanticism.com

http://www.amazon.com/Romanticism-Postromanticism-Claudia-Moscovici/dp/0739116754

The Statuesque Images of Herb Ritts

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Herb Ritts

Herb Ritts

The L. A. based photographer Herbert (Herb) Ritts (1952-2002) bridged the gap between artistic photography and commercial fashion shoots. His work shows that photography can be highly commercial without losing its originality, signature style and aesthetic value.

Herb Ritts

Herb Ritts

Ritts is known around the world for his iconic black and white portraits of celebrities–including Brooke Shields,  Diana Ross, Britney Spears, Madonna, Julia Roberts, Cindy Crawford, Naomi Campbell and Nicole Kidman. His photographs are simple, elegant and statuesque, in poses that transcend our fashions and times and deliberately imitate the style of classical Greek and Roman statues.

Herb Ritts

Herb Ritts

In the course of his long and successful career, Ritts has photographed for some of the most prestigious fashion magazines, such as Esquire, Mademoiselle, Glamour, GQ, Vogue and Elle. The elegance, simplicity, starkness (his images are usually black and white) and timeless, statuesque poses of his fashion shoots and portraits make them stand out as works of art.

Herb Ritts

Herb Ritts

Ritts has also directed music videos, including Madonna’s “Cherish” and Michael Jackson’s “In the Closet”. He passed away in 2002, at the age of 50, due to complications from pneumonia. In the fall of 2012, the  Getty Museum commemorated Ritt’s beautiful artistic legacy with an exhibit of his photography called “L.A. Style”. You can see more of his fashion photography and famous portraits on his website below: 

http://www.herbritts.com/

my teenage heartthrob, Corey Hart, photographed by Herb Ritts

Claudia Moscovici, postromanticism.com

http://www.amazon.com/Romanticism-Postromanticism-Claudia-Moscovici/dp/0739116754